By Katharine Rudzitis On the GMAT, you’ll sometimes encounter tough mathematical expressions. Consider the following Data Sufficiency question: What is the value of x? Statement 1: (x2 – 3)2 - 4(x2 – 3) – 12 = 0 Statement 2: x2 – 2x – 3...
When students begin preparing for the GMAT, I always recommend that they take a GMATPrep practice test early in their studies. I do this for several reasons: Students should know, as soon as possible, exactly what they will be preparing...
- by Katharine Rudzitis (5/19/2015) It's easy to get trapped in an endless cycle of taking practice tests without stopping to carefully consider their results. Sure, taking practice tests will help you become more familiar with the GMAT as...
- by Katharine Rudzitis During math problems on the GMAT, test-takers might see problems like these: x3  - 4x2 + 4x = 0 Does (3x)/(7x) equal 3/7? For what values does [(x+3)(x-5)]/[(x+3)(x-6)] equal (x-5)/(x-6)? It can be tempting to...
- by Katharine Rudzitis GMAT Sentence Correction questions can be challenging, so it’s important to approach each of them with a general strategy. Jumping right into reading the answer choices isn’t the smartest way to proceed. Test-takers...
- By Katharine Rudzitis Many mathematical expressions on the GMAT can be factored using the difference of two squares formula: x2 – y2 = (x + y)(x – y). Applying this formula can save time, but sometimes it’s tough to recognize a...
- by Katharine Rudzitis Traditional GMAT score reports include scores from the Verbal, Quantitative, and Integrated Reasoning sections of the GMAT, as well as the total score for the entire exam. However, these reports don’t provide...
By Katharine Rudzitis Anyone planning to take the GMAT will sit through a Verbal Reasoning section, which includes questions on lengthy Reading Comprehension passages. These questions involve tasks related to the main idea, structure,...
- by Katharine Rudzitis Average speed problems are common on the GMAT. These questions can be tricky if you haven’t practiced solving them, because the most obvious answer choice is a trap. To see why, try the following problem: Joe drives...
In the last article, we learned the algebraic approach and the input-output approach for solving questions with variables in the answer choices (VIACs). In that article, I ended by saying that, while the input-output approach is often...

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