Lesson: Divisor Rules

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Hello Brent,
In the link below

https://gmatclub.com/forum/is-a-multiple-of-139044.html
You wrote " Given: If the average (arithmetic mean) the 4 numbers is 30 "
How did u come to this inference from Question stem
Regards,
Abhimanyu
gmat-admin's picture

Good catch. When I answer Data Sufficiency questions, I paste in a pre-formatted template, and that template has that information about the average. I forgot to delete that part of my template.

I have since edited my response. Thanks!

Hello Brent,
Need one clarification.
When we say if x is a divisor of m and n both means m/x, n/x then ( m+n)/x or ( m-n)/x.

Then in the below example why it can't be true
that when (2k-4) is divisible by 7 then 2k/7 and 4/7 is possible.

Regards,
Abhimanyu
gmat-admin's picture

We need to be careful here. This is an IF-THEN construction.

So, for example, IF x is a divisor of m and n, THEN x is a divisor of m+n, and x is a divisor of m-n. For example, since 5 is a divisor of 25 and 15, we know that 5 is a divisor of 25+15 and 25-15.

We can't necessary reverse that order though.
For example, even though 3 is a divisor of 5+4, we can't conclude that 3 is a divisor of 5 and 3 is a divisor of 4.

Hello Brent, thanks for your exposure so far, can you kindly shed more light on the above rule: for instance, "if 5 is a divisor of 35, then 5 is a divisor of (35)(47), please how did you get 47, in the first example, 98 in the second example and the third example. Please can you provide some insights?
gmat-admin's picture

Hi fobembe,

Those values (47, 98, etc) are arbitrary numbers; they could be ANY integers.

For example, if 5 is a divisor of 35, then 5 must be a divisor of ANY product of 35 and some other integer. So, 5 must be a divisor of the following products:
(35)(11)
(35)(6587)
(35)(-29)
(35)(789,006)
etc.

Likewise, since 13 is a divisor of 39, then we know that 13 must be a divisor of ANY product of 39 and some other integer. So, 13 must be a divisor of the following products:
(39)(8)
(39)(734)
(39)(18,211)
(39)(-41)
etc.

Does that help?

Can you someone help me with this? I can't understand this.

If x is an integer and y = 3x + 2, which of the following CANNOT be a divisor of y?

A. 4
B. 5
C. 6
D. 7
E. 8
gmat-admin's picture

APPROACH #1
Test various possible values of x and y

If x = 1, then y = 5.
So, 5 CAN be a divisor of y
ELIMINATE B

If x = 2, then y = 8.
So, 4 CAN be a divisor of y, and 8 CAN be a divisor of y
ELIMINATE A and E

If x = 3, then y = 11.

If x = 4, then y = 14.
So, 7 CAN be a divisor of y
ELIMINATE D

By the process of elimination, the correct answer is C

------------------------------------

APPROACH #2
For a number to be divisible by 6, the number must by divisible by 2 AND by 3

The question tells us that y = 3x + 2
In other words, y is TWO GREATER than some multiple of 3
In other words, y is NOT divisible by 3
If y is NOT divisible by 3, then y is NOT divisible by 6

Answer: C

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