Lesson: Operations with Fractions

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To solve this problem:

Let p = the product of all the odd integers between 500 and 598, and let q = the product of all the odd integers between 500 and 602. In terms of q, what is the value of 1/p + 1/q?

Are we to memorize the prime numbers between 500 and 1000? If yes then what are the set of numbers for which we should memorize the prime numbers for?
gmat-admin's picture

I think you might be mixing up ODD numbers with PRIME numbers.

Here's my full solution to your question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/let-p-the-product-of-all-the-odd-integers-bet...

ASIDE: As far as memorizing prime numbers goes, I think it's fine to remember the primes from 2 to 97

Sorry to mention this, but there is a typo in your answer to this question:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/if-x-1-10-1-12-1-13-1-14-1-15-then-which-of-the-following-i-229134.html
in this statement:
So, we know that x must be greater than 1/3 AND less than 1/3
I am certain you meant it to be:
So, we know that x must be greater than 1/3 AND less than 1/2
gmat-admin's picture

Good catch!! Thanks Aladdin!
I have edited my response.

Cheers,
Brent

Can you please explain the concept of the smallest number that denominator divides into? How to find that?
gmat-admin's picture

The technique for finding the Lowest Common Denominator is the same as finding the Least Common Multiple (LCM).

So, for example, when adding 1/12 and 7/15, we must first find the LCM of 12 and 15.

Here's a video on finding the LCM: https://www.gmatprepnow.com/module/gmat-integer-properties/video/835

Cheers,
Brent

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